Mobility and movements of escaping sullan proscripts

Mobility and movements of escaping sullan proscripts

PhD project supervised by Luca Fezzi (2020-2024)

Andrea Frizzera

At the beginning of a century in which Rome is almost fully aware of its mediterranean dimension, we can observe the exploitation of the possibilities of movement that the Mare nostrum’s new political configuration can offer. This concerns the commerce, the cultural exchanges, the migrations, but also political refugees. This project wants to conduct an investigation on this last category. So, starting from the existent prosopographic studies, it will be necessary to revisit the ancient sources (literary, epigraphic, numismatic) and the modern studies on sullan proscripts, in order to travel beside them the ways that bring them to find rescue in different places in the Mediterranean sea. This will lead us not only to draw a map (thanks also to digital tools and methods) of proscripts’ movements, but also to understand which choices (political, moral, economic choices), feature their lives in the new contexts in which they finally settle. So, we will be able to appreciate how the proscripts’ mobility resulted very conditioned and it had peculiar features compared to the other displacement typologies. We also hope that such a kind of research could contribute, in a different perspective, to enrich the debate on the political significance of the sullan proscriptions and on the consequences they caused in the Roman world. Finally, we do not exclude the possibility that, by adopting such a kind of approach, the research focus could expand to 43 BC proscriptions.


Can Refugees Save the World? Post-Development Approaches to livelihood from Palestinian Refugee Camps in Lebanon

Can Refugees Save the World? Post-Development Approaches to livelihood from Palestinian Refugee Camps in Lebanon

PhD project supervised by Paola Minoia (2019-2022)

Yafa El Masri

Despite the diaspora, refugee communities carry the responsibility of protecting and reviving their heritage beliefs of hope and good throughout years of exile. Based on their heritage, Palestinian Refugee Camps in Lebanon are resisting the global capitalistic system by replacing humanitarian development aid and market activities with post-development concepts based on cooperation values. This research explores how such local values constitute post-development and decolonial alternatives to international development schemes. In these camps, several volunteer initiatives have emerged as an attempt to redistribute any resources and skills among refugees for the collective benefits of camps dwellers. Therefore, this research sheds light on refugee economies who focus on non-market activities oriented towards Convivalism (the philosophy of living together) to generate overall social well-being. Thus, this research works towards documenting the experience of the Palestinian refugees and sharing its lessons with the reform-seeking world. The final questions would not only discuss how are the innovative post-development approaches involved in creating livelihood in Palestinian refugee camps, but also: How are these approaches produced in Palestinian refugee camps? Can they be transported to other communities to form new models for livelihood? “Another world is possible”, claimed the Motto of the First World Social Forum held in Brazil in 2001, and possibly another world is even necessary. Along these lines, can refugee camps change the world?


Libertas libertina. Homosexuality and Libertinism in the University of Padova

Libertas libertina. Homosexuality and Libertinism in the University of Padova

PhD project supervised by Paola Molino and Mario Infelise (2019-2022)

Michele Visentin

Between the 16th and the 17th centuries, the University of Padova and some cultural circles of the city represented a major centre of dissemination of Libertinism ideas throughout Europe. This movement, even if very heterogeneous, is characterized by some common denominators, e.g. the impossibility to base ethics on religious dogmas, and the interest for direct observation of nature – including the human body.

How far did this cultural climate encourage a relative tolerance (or at least a moral indifference) for homosexuality?  And if so, did this relative tolerance influence the mobility toward Padua of Italian and European students, professors, intellectuals?

The hardest problem of this research is to identify the sources and to analyse them from an unusual perspective. For centuries the expressions of homosexuality have been simply effaced, except for the criminal law. Hence, the necessity to adopt an interdisciplinary approach to find the “echo” of dissident sexualities in different kind of texts and environments.


The Brazilian sugar: A good that crossed the Atlantic in the early modern age (17th century)

The Brazilian sugar: A good that crossed the Atlantic in the early modern age (17th century)

PhD project supervised by Luciano Pezzolo (Università Ca' Foscari, Venezia) (2019-2022)

Alessandro Favatà

The research project investigates the trans-national networks existing between the Italian peninsula and the New World during the 17th century. The analysis of the diffusion and success of specific consumer goods appears to be one of the most appropriate and comprehensive methods for studying these phenomena. Combining a micro and macro-historical approach, the research will focus on the different moments of the sugar commodity chain, from its production to its consumption. A great importance will also be given to the flow of men, credit and information that accompanied and sustained the life of the crop. By analysing travel reports, correspondences, customs registers, culinary and medical recipes, account ledgers of merchants and Libri di commercio e di famiglia  [provide translation, e.g. Trade and family books], the project will investigate how the Italian peninsula and its inhabitants came in touch with this product and the evolving social impact that sugar had on consumption practices.