Occupational structure and labour mobility in historical perspective (1500-1850): Italy and the Mediterranean

Occupational structure and labour mobility in historical perspective (1500-1850): Italy and the Mediterranean

Digital project coordinated by Andrea Caracausi and Benoît Maréchaux

Project overview

This research project explores the evolution of occupational structures and labour mobility from a long-term perspective. It addresses both the way people worked and were on the move in the past and specifically how their occupational choices, migrations and labour relations were affected by global dynamic forces such as warfare mobilization or structural economic changes. By focusing on Italy and the Mediterranean area from the late medieval period to the beginning of the nineteenth century, the project aims to shed new light on the continuity and changes in work, labour mobility, and geographical diffusion of economic activities. It will also contribute to the reconstruction of a bigger picture on a European scale as part of a larger project on occupational structures coordinated by the University of Cambridge (https://www.campop.geog.cam.ac.uk/). In collaboration with the Digital Laboratory for Mobility Research (MobiLab), the research will combine quantitative and qualitative analysis of empirical sources (such as census or lists of convicts and slaves) with the use of digital tools. In particular, GIS techniques will be used in order to map the mobility of people and their shifting occupations as well as to improve the understanding of mobility phenomena from an analytical point of view.

Occupational structure and labour mobility. A first aspect of the research project directed by Prof. Andrea Caracausi deals with the link between changing occupational structures and labour mobility in the Republic of Venice between the early sixteenth century and the beginning of the modern period (1500-1850). Discussing the consequences of political and economic changes that occurred in this period, this project aims ultimately to reconstruct the evolution of the occupational structure in the diverse territories of the Venetian Republic and to explain its determinants using an innovative statistical methodology. It also deals with social, economic and gender aspects using micro-historical approaches to reconstruct labour relations and labour mobility.

Mobility and forced labour. A second aspect of the research project coordinated by the postdoctoral fellow Benoît Maréchaux explores the phenomena of forced mobility of convicts and slaves transported to the galleys of Genoese galley contractors who worked for the Spanish Empire in the sixteenth and seventeenth century. The research will reconstruct the transnational flows of prisoners, analyze the agency of forced mobility and measure mortality in order to discuss the impact of coerced labor and migrations in the past and the way prisoners worked, moved and died in the early modern Mediterranean. This research is part of the project “Forced mobility before the sovereign state. Convict flows, composite polities and the business of galley warfare in the Mediterranean (1528-1715)” carried out at the DiSSGeA within the framework of the Mobility and Humanities project.

Research team:

  • Prof. Andrea Caracausi (occupational structure and general coordinator)
  • Dr. Giulio Ongaro (occupational structure)
  • Dr. Benoît Maréchaux (forced mobility, convict labor and slaves)
  • Dr. Marco Orlandi (Gis and data visualization)

Interns (Update 22 November 2020):

  • Anna Maria Albertini
  • Giovanna Cozzi
  • Giovanni Favretto
  • Simone Tommasi
  • Giorgia Ragana
  • Dana Belen Zuna
  • Gianluca Dalboni


Bo 2022 Project

Bo 2022 Project

Digital project coordinated by Pierluigi Terenzi, Dennj Solera, Giulia Zornetta, Andrea Martini

“Bo 2022” is an innovative digital project that explores the history of the University of Padua by mapping the academic population who animated its cultural and institutional life from the foundation of the Studium in 1222 to the 20th century. Starting from the previous project PADU-A financed by the DiSSGeA, a team composed of medievalists, early modern and modern historians designed an open-access database by using Nodegoat, a web-based research environment developed to build, manage and visualise large sets of historical information. The project is also supported by the University of Padua, the Center for the history of the University of Padua (CSUP), and the University Museum Centre (CAM).

The “Bo 2022” dataset focuses on the students who graduated at the University of Padua during the past 800 years as well as on professors and other employees. Due to the different sources available for each historical period, the database is conceived in modular and separated sections. Each one contains a wide range of prosopographical information, that may include the geographical origin of the students, the scientific area of their studies, their religious belief, the title of their thesis, the final evaluation and many other aspects.

  1. The Medieval Age section (1222-1405) maps all the people who had been qualified as having a relationship with the University during the 13th and 14th centuries by using mainly (but not only) the private charters edited by Andrea Gloria.
  2. The Quattrocento and the “Paduan Golden Age” section (1406-1605) focuses on the students who graduated at the University in that period and were thus recorded in the Acta graduum academicorum Gymnasii Patavini.
  3. The Modern Age section (1606-1805) collects the academic population of Padua from the last years of Galileo’s teaching period to the Austrian government’s reforms.
  4. The Contemporary Age section (19th to 20th centuries) maps all the students who graduated at the University of Padua and, whenever possible, their tutors by using both the students’ files and the dissertation records produced, that were produced by each Faculty.

Beside these sections, the database also focuses on some cross-cutting aspects concerning more than one period: the copyists of medieval manuscripts (13th to 15th centuries) who declared in their writings a connection with the Studium of Padua as current or graduated students, and the hundreds of the students’ coats of arms that have been preserved in the Palazzo del Bo as well as in other buildings of the city (15th to 17th centuries).

Starting from the database, the “Bo 2022” research fellows aims to carry out research on the circulation of both people and ideas connected to such an important centre of high-culture and learning. Consequently, the project is strictly connected with the mobility studies and aims to give an important contribution in measuring the attractiveness of the University of Padua in both an European and Global perspective. Beside the database, three books dedicated to specific aspects of the history of the university will be published on the 800th anniversary of its foundation. The subjects include the mobility of students and its consequences on both their career development and the urban life of Padua during the medieval and early modern period; the intellectual, religious and social freedom guaranteed by the university (the so-called patavina libertas); women and the University of Padua.

Equipe of research

  • Pierluigi Terenzi (1222-1405 and general supervisor/coordinator)
  • Giulia Zornetta (1406-1500)
  • Dennj Solera (1501-1806)
  • Andrea Martini (19th-20th centuries)

Advisory Board

  • Filiberto Agostini
  • Andrea Caracausi
  • Maria Cristina La Rocca
  • Paola Molino
  • Carlotta Sorba
  • Giuliana Tomasella
  • Nicoletta Giovè (manuscripts and copyists)
  • Franco Benucci (coats of arms)

Database collaborators

  • Claudio Caldarazzo (CSUP)
  • Antonella De Robbio
  • Elisa Furlan (borsista “Mille e una lode”)
  • Michele Magri
  • Manoel Maronese
  • Maria Giada Semeraro (CISM)

Some datasets are provided by

  • Rossella Bortolotto (CSUP)
  • Elisabetta Hellmann (CSUP)
  • Remigio Pegoraro (CSUP)

 

Interns (updated June 2020)

Cecilia Alfier, Nicolò Anegg, Luca Bertolani Azeredo, Pavle Bonca, Caterina Borsato, Martina Borsato, Fabio Boscagin, Alessandro Brodesco, Riccardo Cantagallo, Alessandro Chinello, Giusy Ciacera Macauda, Manuel Dell’Armi, Andrea Di Renzo, Federico Feletti, Lisa Fonzaghi, Rosaria Frisone, Marco Gallo, Federico Jarc, Gautier Marcel Pierre Juret-Rafin, Tommaso Laganà, Riccardo Mardegan, Alessio Menini, Michele Mosena, Enrico Rampazzo, Edoardo Ranzato, Gianluca Ratti, Lucia Squillace, Luca Tomasin, Raffaele Usai, Giorgia Visentin, Matteo Visentin, Giovanni Zanella


CoDato: a research project in the study of the circulation of latin texts

CoDato: a research project in the study of the circulation of latin texts

CoDato aims at providing a fundamental resource for the study of the transmission of Latin classical texts and their circulation in Europe: the Codices Vossiani Latini Online. The digital archive gathers 363 codices which form the world-famous Latin part of Isaac Vossius’ manuscript collection held at the Leiden University Library. The database is a fundamental tool both for philologists and paleographers interested in textual and paratextual elements of the Codices Vossiani, and for historians and scholars dealing with history of books and book collections.


MAPFLY project: cartographic WebGIS of the University of Padova

MAPFLY project: cartographic WebGIS of the University of Padova (co-financing)

The Mobility & Humanities Project of Excellence is a co-funder of the ongoing MAPFLY project, led by the Department of Geosciences and aimed at providing the University of Padova with new technological infrastructures to access, visualise and navigate the massive volume of historical map collections stored in several departments of the University. These cartographic collections are distributed over various libraries (in particular the Geography, Geosciences and Engineering libraries). Currently, these materials are not accessible via WebGIS platforms. Therefore, the project aims to provide the University with new dynamic tools to enhance the usability of the collections for topological queries (digitalization, archiving, implementation  of the web platform based on ArcGIS). This mobilisation of the cartographic heritage and knowledge of our University, scheduled for 2021, is critical to the Mobility & Humanities Project. Not only can the factual movements of people or materials be more effectively traced on historical and recent maps but also the cartographic heritage and knowledge of our University can be incorporated into new research and communication practices with the extra-academic audience through the public engagement’s initiatives promoted by the Museum of Geography.